Randi R
Sounds great. Would love to see in a low income community. Lol. Maybe they could influence the wa...
Thanks Terry, Let me know when your article is published. I want to share it with our community as ...
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Posted by on in Multifamily Training and Career Development
puckTuesday night my ten-year-old son, Frankie, and I went to witness the Anaheim Ducks beat the Dallas Stars at the Honda Center. Frankie has been begging me for five years to take him early so we can meet the players before the game. Not knowing anything about hockey, and not trusting the word of a hopeful child, I never went early. But on this particular day, the timing worked out and we arrived at the game about two hours in advance. “What in the world do you do for two hours before a Ducks game?” you ask. A very good question indeed. We covered every inch of the arena, including the Team Store (hold on to your wallets!) and soaked in the rich history of the Honda Center sports, concerts, and events. (Did you know the band, KISS, has an arena football team that plays there? You’re welcome.) At one point, we met a friendly usher who mentioned fans were permitted near the team bench to watch warm ups, which were beginning in about 20 minutes. We rushed down to secure premium seating, but the best we could get was eighth row on the rails of the tunnel used by the players when traveling from the locker room to the bench (and ice). The players were about to come out when Frankie leaned over the rail, extending his ten-year-old arm as far as it could possibly stretch in order to high-five the players as they walked by. Unfortunately, because of his...

Posted by on in Multifamily Training and Career Development
Working in the multifamily sector is immensely rewarding. It's also extremely demanding. Community team members juggle a lot: keeping current residents satisfied, screening and engaging prospects, and making sure the apartment community is kept in tip-top shape, to name just a few of their responsibilities. The most successful multifamily companies find ways to consistently recognize their hardworking and high-performing associates. In addition to simply being the right thing to do, rewards are a great way to keep morale high and boost employee retention.  So what are some of the most effective ways to show your best associates some love? Below are some suggestions. Financial bonuses. Keeping associates happy is about more than just compensation. A company's overall work culture and its commitment to employee development are perhaps even more important factors. But let's face it: everyone likes a little extra cash in their pockets, and there is no shortage of reasons for which apartment companies can award some much-appreciated bonuses. At ROSS, for instance, we award $250 gift cards to high-performing leasing associates, as measured by their Telephone Performance Analysis (TPA) scores; these scores reflect how well associates interact with prospects during phone calls. We also give bonuses every quarter to associates who work at communities with strong scores on customer-satisfaction surveys. In addition, we provide bonuses to maintenance workers who perform well, associates who serve as mentors to new employees and associates who reach particular length-of-service milestones with the company. Paid time off.  Today's associates, particularly millennials, place a laudable...

Posted by on in Multifamily Training and Career Development
Let's face it: virtually nobody likes employee performance reviews. For community managers, performance reviews are one more thing to cram into an already hectic schedule, and they often mean confronting team members about performance issues.  For those being reviewed, the anxiety provoked by sitting down with their boss and going over their work with a fine-tooth comb can be profound. But it doesn't have to be that way. In fact, performance reviews can and should take place in a relaxed setting where boss and employee can frankly discuss performance and set clear goals for growth.  Below are some tips on how community managers can make performance reviews a more comfortable and productive process: Constantly Provide Feedback A performance review should never be the first time a team member hears about negative or even positive aspects of their performance. Effective community managers are always providing feedback to their employees.  When team members receive regular input from their managers, they will have a firm understanding of where they stand going into the review process. This understanding will in turn decrease their stress levels and set the stage for a more relaxed, productive conversation about their future. Be OrganizedFor those conducting the reviews, preparation can be easy to put off until the last minute. But it's important to resist this powerful temptation, or the actual meeting can become a rambling mess. Decide in advance the overarching purpose of the meeting. In other words, what do you want the main takeaway for the employee to be?...

Posted by on in Multifamily Training and Career Development
The goal of an IPEC (Institute of Professional Excellence) coach is to have a complete understanding of what a client wants, what is blocking them and why.  This article is going to focus on what those blocks are and how to break through these barriers. A block is simply anything that hinders you, and it comes from the external (economy) or internal.  An internal block could be your beliefs and your attitudes about the world.  Ironically, 95% of our blocks are internal.  Have you ever heard the saying “Your external appearances are a manifestation of what’s going on inside”?  Simply put, what’s going on inside will reflect your results. Let me give you a simple example.  Have you ever noticed someone who is always late for his appointments and is living in constant chaos?  This is just a reflection of what he is processing internally.  On the other hand, a person who never has an excuse, is always present and attacks any challenge is one who has very few internal blocks. Let me list the four blocks and discuss how to conquer these blocks: Limiting Beliefs Interpretations Assumptions Gremlin A coach uses the acronym GAIL to refer to the blocks.  Gremlins are the most powerful blocks, and limiting beliefs are the least restrictive.  The goal is to understand each of these blocks, remove these blocks and create a new reality.  Let’ begin with limiting beliefs: Limiting belief: This block is responsible for holding someone back from achieving success.  It is something that you accept in life that limits you.  If you believe that you will not...

Posted by on in Multifamily Training and Career Development
Apartment companies spend a vast amount of time and energy making sure their communities provide the ideal environment to attract and retain residents. And justifiably so: low occupancy and stagnant rents are the twin pillars of misery in the multifamily industry. But with all of the focus on residents, it can be easy for apartment firms to neglect a vital task: building the kind of company culture that will attract and retain talented, experienced team members. Today's multifamily team members are looking for more than just a steady paycheck. They want to work for a company where they feel truly supported and part of something larger, where work/life balance is promoted and where advancement is possible. To get down to brass tacks, if your company culture doesn't incorporate those elements, you're going to have unhappy leasing staffs — and, by extension, unhappy residents. Building a Strong Culture Having the right company culture is more important than ever. In 2015, millennials became the largest generation in the U.S. workforce, according to a Pew Research Center analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data. And millennials, more than their predecessors, value a healthy work environment. "Millennials place a high priority on workplace culture and desire a work environment that emphasizes teamwork and a sense of community," says “PwC’s NextGen: A Global Generational Study.” The 2013 report was compiled by PricewaterhouseCoopers, the University of Southern California and the London Business School.  "They also value transparency (especially as it relates to decisions about their careers, compensation and...

Posted by on in Multifamily Training and Career Development
If you're new to the property management/multifamily housing industry, you might feel as if industry veterans speak a language all their own. And, they really do, don’t they? It reminds me of the scene in the movie Good Morning Vietnam where Adrian Cronauer remarks to his boss, who is fond of using military acronyms and jargon, “Excuse me, sir. Seeing as how the VP is such a VIP, shouldn’t we keep the PC on the QT? ‘Cause if it leaks to the VC he could end up MIA, and then we’d all be put on KP.” I remember in my early days my CM coming to me telling me, "Rommel, remember when you're filling out the MSR to get PTE...." WHAT????? So…if you are new to this whole thing, we wanted to give you a quick primer on the terms you’re likely to hear and what they mean, so that you can get up to speed quickly! And if you're an industry veteran please forward this to your new associates and add your own as well! Occupancy: This is a number, expressed in a percentage, that tells how full a community is. So, a 100 unit community with 95 apartments occupied is said to be 95% occupied. Availability/Exposure: This is a number, expressed in a percentage, that tells how many units are available for rent. This number is often confused with occupancy, but it is different! So, if a community has 100 units and there are 8 units available for rent...

Posted by on in Multifamily Training and Career Development
I was doing some work for a company not that long ago and took a few phone calls. Man, it must have been a full moon or something because I spoke with some crazy people that day. If you have worked onsite for any period of time, you know that the multifamily universe does have our share of “cray-cray” people! I had someone yell at me because the United States Postal Service didn’t deliver her package into the mailbox or package locker and instead kept it at the post office. The mail carrier left her a note letting her know of this and she was ticked off at me because USPS did this. (Let that sink in for a bit.) Now, of course, I wanted to say, “I don’t work for USPS! If you have a problem with the UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE have you considered calling the UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE???” Now, since I teach customer service for a living, and since I like this gig, I figured I better not say what I wanted to say. So, I tried to grit my teeth through it-and even though I did my best to help her, she still had a conniption, yelled at me one final time, said some things that I cannot print here and hung up on me. Incidentally, I don’t know if she ever called the United States Postal Service. So, how do you handle them?? One: Do not become the problem! One of the most important things you can do...

Posted by on in Multifamily Training and Career Development
Every property manager and landlord knows that apartment inspections are an essential part of a property management business. When you stay on top of the condition of your property, you can avoid the pitfall of unexpected expenses, and your tenants will remain happy and satisfied. Despite their importance, it is easy to make mistakes during a property inspection that can cause you major issues down the road. When you are aware of these three common mistakes made during the inspection process, you can identify ways to conduct them more efficiently and better protect your assets and your property.   Poorly Detailed Inspection Reports The key to an effective inspection report is in the details. During every inspection, all condition issues, home quality concerns, and damages or repairs need to be stated clearly on the report. It is essential to back up all of your inspection findings with photographs to document any issues and the current condition of the property. By doing this you will be protecting yourself and your investments from any tenant misunderstandings or conflicts
 Only Conducting Move-in/Move-out Inspections All landlords are aware of the importance of inspections conducted before a tenant moves into the property and after they move out. However, this is not the only time that inspections should be completed! Having a clear inspection schedule done on a regular basis throughout the year will help you to stay ahead of any damage or maintenance issues that may come up with the property. Just remember to give your...

Posted by on in Multifamily Training and Career Development
Are you over-promising and under-performing? Not the best business plan ever. No one has ever gotten a job or a raise from over-promising and under-performing.   I get it. You want people to like you. You want people to admire you. You don’t want to give them bad news or be mad at you. You’re super optimistic about what you can get done. All sorts of reasons that we might over-promise. So what do you do? You soften the news. At home it’s, “Ok babe. I’ll be ready to go in five minute!.” As you’re standing there in your unmentionables still deciding what to wear and in desperate need of a shower. (Don’t judge me, you’ve all done this. I’ve done it three times this week already.)   In a work situation it’s, “I’ll have this project to you in…um…three days. Yes, three days. For sure.” Then when you get it to them in a week they’ve probably been blowing up your inbox or phone, have lost confidence in you and (the absolute WORST) are disappointed in you. UGH.   Unless three days is actually feasible, why not be honest? “Listen, I’d love to have this to you in three days, but it’s going to take two weeks.“ Sure, they might be a little disappointed that you’re not going to have it in three days. But watch their eyes light up when you get it to them in one week.   Wouldn’t you say that eye lighting up is SO much...

Posted by on in Multifamily Training and Career Development
Have you ever noticed when eating at a restaurant that the waiter waits for you to order before serving your entree to you? Can you imagine if the waiter just dumped a bunch of food in front of you and expected you to eat (and pay for) whatever he brought to your table? You: “Um, excuse me…I’m allergic to shellfish and you brought me clams, mussels and scallops!” Waiter: “That’s what I’m giving you today! That will be $25.99 plus tax, please. Have a nice day.” Let me ask you another question: Have you ever worked with someone who just seemed to talk to you, whether you wanted her to or not? You know the person who seemed to ignore the fact that you have ten files on your desk, multiple windows open on your computer, the voice mail light flashing on your phone and a “to-do” list a mile long. Here’s another question . . . have you ever been that person? Are you that person now? Have you ever thought about your effect on people? I mean, we’re very aware of the effect that people have on us, but have you ever thought about the impact that your style of relating has on others? The nature of the multifamily industry means that you will have to deal with people every day! And if you’re a temporary employee the odds are good that your co-workers will change pretty often. That makes it very important for you to be able to connect effectively with a lot of different kinds...