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Training Trivia

On average, a computer running a screensaver uses over 100W of electricity. How much electricity does a computer use in sleep mode?

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1718963763 [{"id":"188","title":"5 watts","votes":"9","pct":"42.86","type":"x","order":"1","resources":[]},{"id":"189","title":"10 watts","votes":"5","pct":"23.81","type":"x","order":"2","resources":[]},{"id":"190","title":"25 watts","votes":"5","pct":"23.81","type":"x","order":"3","resources":[]},{"id":"191","title":"50 watts","votes":"2","pct":"9.52","type":"x","order":"4","resources":[]}] ["#ff5b00","#4ac0f2","#b80028","#eef66c","#60bb22","#b96a9a","#62c2cc"] sbar 200 200 /polls/vote/72-on-average,-a-computer-running-a-screensaver-uses-over-100w-of-electricity-how-much-electricity-does-a-computer-use-in-sleep-mode No answer selected. Please try again. Thank you for your vote. Answers Votes ...
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Posted by on in Apartment Maintenance
The official start of spring is just weeks away, which will certainly come as a relief to those parts of the country who have experienced a particularly rough winter. Spring brings warmer temperatures, more hours of daylight and spring cleaning – a chance to organize, simplify and get rid of things we no longer need. Spring cleaning can be an opportunity for you to clean up your community and add curb appeal right before the busy spring and summer leasing season kicks off. Want to get your residents involved? Designate an upcoming Saturday as Spring Cleaning Saturday in your community. While your staff focuses on sprucing up common areas, your residents can do their part by cleaning and organizing their own homes. Here are a few ideas to get residents involved. Load up on trash and recycle binsPlace extra trash and recycling bins throughout your community for the weekend. Residents will take advantage of the extra bins to do a deep cleaning of their apartments, and the extra bins will prevent your community from being overrun with trash. Arrange for a donation pickupOne person’s trash is another person’s treasure! Arrange for your local Salvation Army or other charity to come to your community to pick up clothing, books and other items that your residents no longer use. Ask your residents to drop off their donations at the leasing office by a certain time to ensure their donations make it on the truck. Get the word outLet your residents know about Spring Cleaning...

Posted by on in Social Media and Technology
After long-held industry speculation, one area of suspicion surrounding social media for SEO was formally affirmed in a recent case study performed by Stone Temple Consulting, finding that Facebook 'likes' and 'shares' don't directly affect search rankings. It's another example that Google isn't dictated by popular thought of what a search engine should do.  And when it comes to their ever-changing algorithm, nothing is set in stone. Stone Temple Consulting put this notion to the test by sending hundreds of 'likes' to a series of test pages on Facebook. They found that, despite the 800+ likes going to each of the pages, not a single one had been crawled or indexed by Google¹. This shows that, despite having a great deal of attention drawn to these pages over a relatively short period of time, Google did not interpret these pages as being more relevant than others, and therefore did not index them. But why wouldn’t Google count signals from Facebook? Facebook ‘likes’ are not considered trustworthy sources of information by major search engines because there is no way to test their authenticity. For example, when a search engine crawls an apartment community's Facebook page, it is able to see the total number of likes that page has received and the company it is associated with, along with a few other bits of basic information like their location and industry category. The search engine cannot, however, determine anything about the credibility of the source, and cannot tell the difference between an honestly earned ‘like’, and one that was paid...

Posted by on in Apartment Investment
With the business world buzzing around crowdfunding, the idea of going straight to the consumer to raise capital for everything from product prototypes to feature-length films, the funding process has now stepped into the real estate realm. Aside from corporate buyouts, real estate transactions can be some of the biggest deals, both in terms of dollar amounts and profits. But how can smaller investors looking to invest in real estate afford to invest in larger deals like apartment or multifamily property? What once was achievable only through something like an IPO, is now a possibility thanks to the JOBS Actwhich was signed into effect in 2012, helping small businesses and entrepreneurs access capital. In its current state, the options for how funding can be raised are limited, but once the SEC issues its regulations for crowdfunding, allowing non-accredited investors to participate, the number of investors will increase. As it sits, companies are able to raise up to $1 million in capital within a 12-month period. Individuals with an annual income of less than $100k can raise up to 5% of their income, while those with an income over $100k can raise 10%. While making any type of investment can be risky, investing in the real estate market might be too much for some investors to handle. For these types of investors, something like crowdfunding might just be the best new alternative. Crowdfunding is the process by which a number of informed investors put money into a single deal by investing smaller, divided shares....

Posted by on in Resident Retention
Recently I started reading Ryan Holiday, Growth Hacker Marketing. In the book Ryan explained about Product Market Fit and how growth hackers believe  products should be changed until they are ready to generate explosive reactions from the people who will see them. This was like a revelation to me, but not in the sense of marketing – as you would think – but in creating resident events. See, for the past few weeks I have been talking with several friends about which kind of resident events they were doing at their properties and I learned they were all doing the same thing! When I asked what made those events so special for the residents they replied that attendance was low. So, as I was sitting on the bus reading this section of Ryan’s book, a light bulb went off in my head! “Why can’t we apply what he is saying to how we are planning our resident events?” Before you start planning events, make certain you ask the residents what kind of events they would be interested in attending. Next, look over  prior resident events and attendance. See if there are common denominators among these events and the residents requests. This will give you a good base for deciding on future resident events. At many properties it is the leasing manager, activities director and sometimes the marketing director’s responsibility to create resident events. Establish a process to assist the party planner with determining the marketing plan and attendance potential for each event....

Posted by on in Property Management
Part Two: Pest Control-getting the bugs out! This is the second part of a three part series on Building Vendor Relationships find the first part here.   A good relationship with your pest control company and your spray tech is important for a few reasons.  The spray tech is in every one of your apartments once or twice a year, and can be an asset to you and your company.  He or she interacts with residents fairly often, and he also can help you in the event of bed bugs, which are becoming more and more common.   The first reason to have a good relationship with your pest control company is that they go into your apartments quite frequently. They must be trustworthy, and you must be able to depend on them to see what’s going on in your community.  If you think your pest control spray tech is weird, so will your residents.  He or she should be personable and able to speak confidently about his/her business to you or your residents.  You can also ask them to bring housekeeping or unauthorized pet issues to your attention, and they should be happy to do so.  This is especially important if you work on a property in which no maintenance person goes with the pest control tech.   Second, their job is very important to the comfort of your residents and the reputation of your community.  Your pest control company should have a plan for flea infestation, bed bed bugs...

Posted by on in Property Management
Part One: Building a Relationship with your Landscaper. Does your landscaper know where the model is? While apartment community staff are generally jacks of all trades, there are many times we depend on specialists to get the job done. In most cases, it is not cost effective to hire staff dedicated to jobs such as landscaping, painting or cleaning, and pest control. So we reach out to our vendors to help us with these tasks. Building a relationship, not only with the business, but with the people that perform these tasks is of the utmost importance to your community’s success.  In this, the first of a three part series about building vendor relationships, we’ll discuss the relationship between a community and its landscaping company. Does your landscaper know where your model is?  Does the supervisor of the landscaping team know where you take your prospects each day and keep the “golden path” looking...golden? This should be one of the first questions your new landscaper asks, or something that your current landscaper can point to with his eyes closed.  What about you?  Do you know who is in charge of your weekly visit? Knowing the name and phone number of your landscaping team supervisor will help ensure that your property is alway looking good.  As a business that depends a great deal on curb appeal, one of your main objectives should be to tend to that curb!  And that’s where a great landscaping team can come in.    Create a great landscaping...

Posted by on in Property Management
Strong leaders, who put themselves on the front line, are quite often those whom others want to follow. Weak leaders, who cling to the back office, often lack enthusiasm or personality that no amount of training will ever change.   Who is running your business?   According to a leadership study conducted by Development Dimensions International (DDI) together with HR.com and the Institute for Human resources, back office clingers can be costly. How costly? A survey of 300 Human Resource professionals revealed the following about weak leadership:   69% said it caused lower rates of employee engagement 65% said it caused a loss of productivity 59% said it resulted in higher turnover “of themselves or team members.”  This study also revealed that 56% of those surveyed agreed that the number one reason for leadership failure is lack of interpersonal skills. Interpersonal skills are the life skills we use every day to communicate and interact with other people, both individually and in groups.  People who work on developing strong interpersonal skills are usually more successful in both their professional and personal lives than those who don’t.  It can be difficult to practice and fine tune these skills if you are clinging to the back office.   In contrast, front line leaders often lead by walking around. The “walk around” leadership approach traces its origins back to the 1940s. Its popularity expanded in the 1980s after being included in the book, In Search of Excellence. Steve Jobs was the ultimate practitioner of this leadership approach, taking it beyond...

Posted by on in Multifamily Training and Career Development
Let’s face it, learning new software can be hard. You might think the biggest challenge we face when training an apartment portfolio on new technology is overcoming different skill levels in our learners. But really, the biggest hurdle is fear of technology, fear of change, fear of screwing things up... basically just fear. As a trainer, oftentimes I'll outline a fantastic step-by-step plan to usher clients  from one software program to another,  only to find they still haven't gotten past the login page when I check back even weeks later. No matter what type of training, I encounter excuses like, “I'm too busy” ... “I don’t like that sort of training” .... “I can’t remember anything the trainer said”... and the list goes on and on. If I really probe, I usually come up with the root cause, and most often it's fear. Digital natives don’t have the same issues with technology. There's an element of learned intuition in how they discover and explore new software programs. Because they've developed that familiarity, it just makes sense to them. For those who aren't comfortable with software, this fear of trying something new is a big enough obstacle that they'd rather just continue their usual tasks and routines. But if we can get them to give it a shot, then they actually make great strides. To help technophobes get over their fear, here are some techniques that my team and I have found effective: Always make sure the learner understands how the software will directly benefit them, and the way they do their job....

Posted by on in Property Management
b2ap3_thumbnail_memoriesaremade.jpg It was in the way she held her 4 year old son tightly against her chest, a crack of hallway light drifting into his dark bedroom. He was sobbing softly. She could feel his warm body through his Cars footy pajamas. “Honey, you are burning up. Let your mommy take your temperature.” It was in the way three generations of men lounged on the couch with the television blaring the football game. The moms and wives were sitting around the table in the other room talking and laughing and sharing. The fragrance from their open bottle of wine was filling their noses. It was in the way the newlyweds poured over their parsimonious bank statements in the dining room, his brow furrowed and her hand lightly grasping her belly. Two little red lines told the story of their future. It was in the way a group of young kids from different parts of the country were forced to live together and form a bond which would last for the rest of their lives. It was in the way a new couple fumbled for each other in the dark hallway and found love. When the computers go silent and the leasing manager flips the lights out and closes the leasing doors, they go home to make their own memories. The most touching thing about multifamily is that we don’t “sell” a product that people throw away. We aren’t a bottle of Coke, or a t-shirt, or a pair of white high-heeled...

Posted by on in Multifamily Training and Career Development
I’ll admit it … I just got really irritated at my phone. I was sitting in a waiting room, for all of two minutes, and my phone was loading the web browser really slowly. It must have taken 15 seconds or so for the browser to come up from the moment I tapped on the icon on my home screen. 15 seconds….someone’s head needs to roll!! I mean, what else am I going to do while waiting in a waiting room? Admit it…haven’t you felt the same way when your phone isn’t connecting as quickly as you’d like it to, or as quickly as you’re used to? I love it when I see people holding up their phones like the Statue of Liberty’s torch trying to get the 4GLTE light to appear. DIAL-UP Here’s the funny part about this … if you’re like me, you’re first experience with the Internet was with that wonderfully ancient tool known as “DIAL UP.” I remember the first time I heard that electronic screeching (I don’t know how else to describe it) sound coming from my computer; and then waiting about five minutes before the first semblance of a webpage began to appear. And, it was GLORIOUS! Yes, it took minutes for things to load, and if you tried downloading a song or something, you needed to make some coffee and get comfortable because it was going to take a while. But it didn’t matter because you were connected. Who cares how long it takes?...