Topic: What would be your approach to this situation. Resident lives on a 3rd floor and broke her leg.

Mauricio Serna's Avatar Topic Author
Mauricio Serna
What would be your approach to this situation. Resident lives on a 3rd floor, broke her leg and we have no other units available on walking floor neither on sister properties in the area. Still has 8-9 months on her Lease and is fighting termination fees. Thank you!
Posted 1 year 3 months ago
Sandra Ti's Avatar Topic Author
Sandra Ti
Broke my foot and was in a cast and boot for 6 months. I worked full time and had 2 year old. I lived on the second floor. I was rough, but I managed. I think the only thing that can save her is a request for accommodation along with a note from a medical professional.
Posted 1 year 3 months ago
Laura Ryan's Avatar Topic Author
Laura Ryan
Life happens. I do feel bad for her but termination fees would still apply. She really has nothing to fight about.
Posted 1 year 3 months ago
Brittney Ziebell's Avatar Topic Author
Brittney Ziebell
Reasonable accommodation
Posted 1 year 3 months ago
Jeffery McDonald's Avatar Topic Author
Jeffery McDonald
It’s up to you and/or your company policy and level of discretion that you have in this situation. Walking up with a boot and crutch is not impossible and she would likely be ok, but also if you wanted to help her then do so - maybe try to get the apartment leased (without taking away too much energy from other leasing objectives).
Posted 1 year 3 months ago
Anonymous's Avatar Topic Author
Anonymous
Is it worth being an ass about? Or do you want "good press"?
Posted 1 year 3 months ago
Caitlyn Christain's Avatar Topic Author
Caitlyn Christain
I agree. Especially if this has been an agreeable tenant. Sometimes, you show kindness. I would just charge her for how much it costs to turn her unit, and she should understand (cleaning and fresh paint.)
Posted 1 year 3 months ago
Lori Doles-Manges's Avatar Topic Author
Lori Doles-Manges
I don’t know that this has anything to do with being an ass but more so of when you do for one you have to do for all. Does he want to open up that can of worms? Sounds as if she was given options and she doesn’t like the answer.
Posted 1 year 3 months ago
Anonymous's Avatar Topic Author
Anonymous
You have to do the same for everyone in that situation. Since you're not going to have many tenants in this particular situation, i think they're pretty safe. I for sure wouldn't want to put her in a position where she could not get out of her apartment safely in case of an emergency. Letting her out of her lease with documented proof is the right thing to do.
Posted 1 year 3 months ago
Lori Doles-Manges's Avatar Topic Author
Lori Doles-Manges
She was given the option to terminate with fees. She didn’t like those. Regardless we as managers have to remember we have obligations to the owners which is to make the best decision for them. Once you do for one you have to do for all or you better have all of your ducks in a row and plenty of documentation as to why she was just released from her lease.

The likelihood of them not dealing with this particular situation (broken leg) probably won’t come up again for awhile but you can easily have another situation that is related to health and a reason why they need to be released from their lease. You can’t treat this single incident differently than others without documenting why. You open yourself up to the possibility of a Fair Housing Violation.
Posted 1 year 3 months ago
Tia Sears Kendall's Avatar Topic Author
Tia Sears Kendall
Let her out of her lease and get well soon and hopefully she’ll be back later. The press on that alone could be detrimental
Posted 1 year 3 months ago
Alisha Dawn Godbey's Avatar Topic Author
Alisha Dawn Godbey
Something to think about from a risk Prospective; what if she falls again because she has a boot and Crutches?! Customer satisfaction over probability always equals Profitability! Do the right thing and let her out of her lease. Have her put it it writing and your covered.
Posted 1 year 3 months ago
Lesli Roddy Frazier's Avatar Topic Author
Lesli Roddy Frazier
Ask her doctor to put something in writing. It’s actually a accommodating request
Posted 1 year 3 months ago
Kari Corveno's Avatar Topic Author
Kari Corveno
You're asking for a lawsuit. She can't reside in a home she can't get out of in the event of an emergency. The right thing to do is allow her to break the lease.
Posted 1 year 3 months ago
Doreen Mogni Ercolano's Avatar Topic Author
Doreen Mogni Ercolano
I would let her out of her lease without fees. This was not planned and you never know what life will throw our way. A little empathy can go along way especially during these challenging times.
Posted 1 year 3 months ago
Chris Finetto's Avatar Topic Author
Chris Finetto
6 to 8 weeks in a cast and crutches...??? You can’t reasonably accommodate... I’m surprised they want to relocate. Moving sucks, moving with a broken leg sucks more...

If they have a place to get, cut them loose. Charge a transfer fee or similar. You didn’t break her leg, she didn’t mean to break her leg... Cover you make-ready costs and modest amount for rent loss. There’s times to be fair, if they were a good resident - be gentle...
Posted 1 year 3 months ago
Rashelle Renee's Avatar Topic Author
Rashelle Renee
100% Reasonable Accommodation
Send it to the regional or whomever they get sent to. It's out of your hands then. I don't see why it wouldn't be approved... this is small potatoes to the company in the overall picture
(Personally I'd also include a statement about the probability of lawsuit in case of emergency and potential bad press if denied)
Posted 1 year 3 months ago
Amy Justus Katz's Avatar Topic Author
Amy Justus Katz
Get approval from your regional to waive fees. Don’t be the assholes charging fees because someone LEGITIMATELY cannot access/use their unit safely... and if for no other reason, the online reviews you’ll get if you don’t will cost you leases I’m sure. I definitely wouldn’t rent a place with a management company who refused to be reasonable humans
Posted 1 year 3 months ago
Joe Mendez's Avatar Topic Author
Joe Mendez
Have her submit a reasonable accommodation request and waive the fees. You’d do the same for anyone in the same situation.
Posted 1 year 3 months ago
Meghan Foster's Avatar Topic Author
Meghan Foster
Obtain the medical documentation of need, and it becomes reasonable accommodation.
Let them move.

It isn’t about being “nice or not”
lol these people are so funny!
It’s about treating everyone fairly. We have an industry practice in place for these things, so that they don’t have to be personal decisions.
Posted 1 year 3 months ago
Mag Guarino's Avatar Topic Author
Mag Guarino
Contact your RPM and ask for buy-in to make the exception and let them out of their lease. Ask resident to NOT discuss with anyone since it’s a one-time exception. Keep good notes in case of FH questions.
Posted 1 year 3 months ago
Rachel Lynette Payton's Avatar Topic Author
Rachel Lynette Payton
It's already been said.... fair housing, reasonable accommodation. Can't charge lease break for medical issues.
Posted 1 year 3 months ago
Carol Williamson's Avatar Topic Author
Carol Williamson
To risk law suit if she falls down stairs ask for 30 day notice no fees markets hot right know probably be able to release it at higher rent!! She probably will have a hard time finding accommodations and come back to cancel her notices
Posted 1 year 3 months ago
Mallory A Bailey's Avatar Topic Author
Mallory A Bailey
Fair Housing. You have to get her a ground floor or let her out of her lease, no lease break penalty.
Posted 1 year 3 months ago
Lisa Michelle Allen England's Avatar Topic Author
Lisa Michelle Allen England
Let her out of the lease. This falls under ADA Compliance. If you cannot accommodate and transfer the resident, you have to release them from the lease, and you cannot charge termination fees
Posted 1 year 3 months ago
Heather Taylor's Avatar Topic Author
Heather Taylor
So much misinformation here. The lease has a termination clause and if it says pay fees, then she should pay. All of you saying fair housing or reasonable accommodation may need to retrain. To qualify for a reasonable accommodation you must have a disability. The definition of disability is any condition that is expected to last a lifetime. A broken leg is not permanent. It's inconvenient for sure but their responsibility to figute out. She has help to move, then they can help her live while recovering. No different than someone in hospital for a month or more, still have to pay rent. She's probably still working and one leg? That's just crutches. Again inconvenient but not the owners responsibility to figure out
Posted 1 year 3 months ago
Richard Dillane's Avatar Topic Author
Richard Dillane
Let her out of the lease.
Charge the cleaning fee only, that's fair.
Do not ask upper management or request a medical letter.
Talk to her as a friend, be compassionate and offer any other help she needs.
Do you want a good referral or, worse, think of what she could write.
That's in her best interest, the company's best interest and your best interest.
Posted 1 year 3 months ago
Richard 's Avatar
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Let her out of the lease today.
Don't ask upper management nor request a medical letter.
You don't have to do for all, each is on a case by case basis.
Go to the tenant, as a friend, tell her you feel the termination fee is unfair in this situation.
Ask if you can be of any other assistance such as a letter to her new apartment, etc.
Would you rather have a glowing referral or, worse, think of what she can write.
This is in her best interest, the company's best interest and your best interest.
Let us know the outcome.
Posted 1 year 3 months ago
Last edit: by Richard .
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