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Form 1099s & Year End Statements

By Salvatore Friscia, San Diego Premier Property Management, San Diego, CA

For property management companies, the month of January signals a time to prepare and issue year end statements to their clients for tax preparation purposes. Consequently, each January the IRS requires that any taxpayers who have made payments in excess of $600 to workers that are not considered employees must prepare Form 1099 – Miscellaneous Income. Property management companies are also federally required to file Form 1099 for their clients regarding rental income received throughout the year. In addition, copies of this completed form must be provided to the IRS. The IRS compares the payments shown on the information returns with each recipient’s income tax return to determine whether the payments were reported as income and done so properly.

 

The filing deadline for Form 1099 is January 31, 2012.

The IRS also requires that you file a Form 1096 to identify all of the Form 1099s.

The filing deadline for Form 1096 is February 28, 2012.

 

Failure to issue a Form 1099 and file Form 1096 results in penalties and potential disallowances of deductions for those amounts paid. Thus it is imperative to comply with these filing requirements. In years past, SDP Management would spend a lot of time and resources preparing large bulky paper laden year end packages to meet these requirements. The packages, which contained printed year end statements and other tax required documents, would detail the properties prior year performance and provide necessary documentation for the client’s CPA or tax preparer. All packages would be carefully prepared prior to the end of January and mailed via snail mail (USPS) at a considerable cost. Well, the industry has advanced and those days are long gone. The advent of cloud computing and advanced property management software, such as Buildium, have allowed property managers to formulate numerous detailed reports and provide them via email in PDF format to clientele at a fraction of the cost and time. These reports also meet state and federal requirements. It has also allowed the tedious and many times misunderstood Form 1099 to be computer generated and scheduled for automated mailing. Not only is this convenient for property management companies, but it also allows clientele to continue forwarding the year end PDF report to their CPA or tax preparer regardless of where they are in the world. Don’t let 1099s and year end reports get you down, use January to focus on the upcoming year and not the past.

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