Enter your email address for weekly access to top multifamily blogs!

Rommel Anacan

Welcome to my blog on MFI! This blog allows me to have an ongoing conversation with multifamily professionals like you. My focus is on helping you and your companies succeed by helping you optimize the quality of your relationships. If you'd like more information about me, my company and the ways that I can help you, please visit my website at www.RelationshipDifference.com

Motivating People Hallmark Style

Motivating People Hallmark Style

How many of you love watching the Christmas Movies on Hallmark Channel? 

 

While I may need to turn in my “man card” by saying this, (not that anyone would have ever accused me of having one in the first place) I have no problem admitting that I am a huge fan of movies such as The Christmas Card, Matchmaker Santa, Naughty and Nice, and The Most Wonderful Time of the Year. 

 

In one of the beginning scenes of The Most Wonderful Time of the Year, Ralph (a retired police office from New York portrayed by Henry Winkler) is in an airport and doesn't quite know where to go to catch his flight. As he stands, lost and confused, in the middle of the airport, a person runs into him with a baggage cart. 

 

Indignant, Frank yells (in his New Yawker accent), "Hey, I'm standing here!" The airport baggage handler simply ignores him and continues on his way. (I won't spoil the rest of the plot, but it is a great Holiday movie.)

 

Have you ever felt like no one seems to see you standing there? Have you ever felt as if no one noticed you, or your skills, talents, or accomplishments? Have you ever felt like another face in the crowd of faces? I think we all have at one time or another. 

 

“Just a Leasing Consultant”

 

Early in my career it was clear to me that many of the higher-ups thought of me as “just a leasing consultant.” I constantly felt that no matter what I said or did that their view of me was colored simply by the seat that I sat in, and they didn’t see what seat I could have been sitting in. And that had a negative effect on my (internal) attitude. I tried not to let it show and/or affect my work, but man, I just wanted out. (And yes, the irony is not lost on me that I now make a living as a consultant, strategist, speaker and trainer in the industry today!)

 

Yet, it's also pretty easy to not see the other people in our lives, isn't it? 

 

If you lead people, one of the most effective things you can do to improve your leadership effectiveness is simply to notice your people “standing there!” We are all driven by a desire to be seen and heard; and when we feel seen, when we feel heard, we are much more engaged, effective and positive, which makes us much better employees. 

 

We've all felt slighted. We've all felt ignored. We've all felt invisible and two feet small. So, perhaps as we go about our day to day lives (especially this Holiday season), we can try to see, notice and acknowledge the people around us, the people we lead, the people we work for and work with, and especially the ones we're most likely to miss.

 

----

 

Photo: The cast of "The Most Wonderful Time of the Year"

Rate this blog entry:
0
 
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

Great post! When our residents do not feel valued, they move. When team members look upon themselves as employees who are "only" this or that job title, they disengage. Those who feel "less than" will not perform any part of their duties with sheer joy and confidence. Thus the likelihood that Upper Management will reward their efforts decreases dramatically. Happy employees/team members do receive praise, bonuses, promotions and are given "special passes" generally on a continuing basis which motivates them further to continue those positive behaviors.

Those who seem negative - "Why should I do more when I never get anything else in return?" thinking destroys a good team. Yes, holiday time is a good place to start, but ironically, holidays roll around at the end of the year, at the end of another quarter, at performance review time. Why must managers always wait to notice, add supportive measures, give praise?

Happy, confident team members seems to relish tackling additional duties and rise to the challenge. Those are most likely those people who an internally motivated AND externally motivated. They can enjoy the fruits of their labors because they are fun to be around, exhibit a positive attitude almost every day, and want to help others. However, those who are having some issues in the workplace, may also be internally motivated and that is the only thing that keeps them going every day. They have learned self-reliance and are competent but they do not go out of their way to support the team in obvious ways. As managers evaluate their teams, I believe they owe it to those team members to understand what makes them tick and offer the same challenges to those employees.

What have you found, Rommel, that helps during the holiday season to make employees feel more valued? Secret Santa exchanges? Party? Taking on a charitable project as a team? Giving am extra afternoon off as a paid reward? I think most onsite teams would welcome and actual written letter...

Great post! When our residents do not feel valued, they move. When team members look upon themselves as employees who are "only" this or that job title, they disengage. Those who feel "less than" will not perform any part of their duties with sheer joy and confidence. Thus the likelihood that Upper Management will reward their efforts decreases dramatically. Happy employees/team members do receive praise, bonuses, promotions and are given "special passes" generally on a continuing basis which motivates them further to continue those positive behaviors.

Those who seem negative - "Why should I do more when I never get anything else in return?" thinking destroys a good team. Yes, holiday time is a good place to start, but ironically, holidays roll around at the end of the year, at the end of another quarter, at performance review time. Why must managers always wait to notice, add supportive measures, give praise?

Happy, confident team members seems to relish tackling additional duties and rise to the challenge. Those are most likely those people who an internally motivated AND externally motivated. They can enjoy the fruits of their labors because they are fun to be around, exhibit a positive attitude almost every day, and want to help others. However, those who are having some issues in the workplace, may also be internally motivated and that is the only thing that keeps them going every day. They have learned self-reliance and are competent but they do not go out of their way to support the team in obvious ways. As managers evaluate their teams, I believe they owe it to those team members to understand what makes them tick and offer the same challenges to those employees.

What have you found, Rommel, that helps during the holiday season to make employees feel more valued? Secret Santa exchanges? Party? Taking on a charitable project as a team? Giving am extra afternoon off as a paid reward? I think most onsite teams would welcome and actual written letter thanking them and identifying their individual efforts have played a significant role in achieving property goals. Idk. Other ideas????

Read More
  Mindy Sharp

Comment Below

  1. Posting comment as a guest. Sign up or login to your account.
Attachments (0 / 3)
Share Your Location
When it comes to the multifamily business, we're only as good as the people we employ.  One employee CAN ruin your reputation.  From personal experience a lot of employee issues deal with a lack of motivation no matter how much we train or reward them.  We must identify quickly if our employees and teams lack motivation and if they could cause harm to our business.  We all must act as CMO's (Chief Motivation Officer).   Motivation isn't consistent.  Motivati...
Oprah calls these moments, “Ah Ha!” moments. You know – those moments of enlightenment. However, I have found myself in those “Oh! Sh%t!” moments more often than the other. So, how do you get from one to the other? Practice. Experience. Creative problem solving. Collaboration. And, Sheer will power, in some cases.   Here’s an example of a time when I realized I was in an “Oh, Shoot!” moment. I’ve had many but I’ll just share this o...
True customer loyalty is perhaps the greatest asset a community can develop. Loyal residents are more likely to renew and—equally important—refer their friends and family. In my blog last week, Are Your Satisfied Residents Defecting?, I made a point that satisfied residents are not always loyal AND there are times when loyal residents are not loyal. Resident loyalty can be difficult to build and even harder to sustain, but when you consider the fact that the cost of attracting new...