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Culture Cultivation: How to Build It at New and Existing Organizations

Culture Cultivation: How to Build It at New and Existing Organizations
People hear me say it all the time: Culture is the single-most important element in the success of a company.  The blueprint to cultivate that culture, however, can vary widely as no one-size-fits-all solution exists. Today we’ll examine the differences between creating culture at a new company as opposed to an established one. While they are separate challenges, each presents a unique opportunity. Organizational leaders might have to go about their culture-building initiatives differently in each case, but the prospective benefits can propel the company to its true potential and perhaps beyond. In either case, it begins with a strong foundation. I liken building the culture of an organization to developing the foundation of a large building. Components such as concrete, metal, gravel, wood and weather-proofing materials each serve a singular function, but when you combine these critical pieces, it enables the foundation to become strong enough to support the weight of the building. The strength of the cultural foundation is critical to supporting the structural edifice of the entire organization—not just in the early stages of the company’s growth, but for the years and decades to come. Here’s a look at some of the nuances of creating effective cultures at new and established companies:  A new company Naturally, the primary advantage of creating a culture at a new company is that you can start from the ground up. No inherent flaws or biases exist within the workplace and you’re operating with a clean slate. You can create the culture based upon any ......
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Your People Are Your Brand! Are They Prepared?

Your People Are Your Brand! Are They Prepared?
  Until they merged with United Airlines I made a decision that I would NEVER again fly Continental Airlines. Ever. This was all because of one bad experience I had with a member of the Continental flight crew while traveling. After this experience whenever I saw a commercial or marketing piece for Continental, I thought of this crew member and how she treated me. No amount of colorful airline livery or fancy marketing would ever replace the fact that to me that flight attendant was Continental Airlines. And since I didn’t like my experience with her, I didn’t like the company. Period. End of story. What does this have to do with your company? I don’t care if your CEO has degrees from Harvard, Yale and Oxford; or if your executives have every certification given in the multi-family universe; or if your regional managers are the most intelligent and articulate groups of regionals the industry has ever seen . . . to the average customer, they are not your ‘brand.’ The people sitting behind the leasing desks are your brand. The people answering the phones at your community, responding to emails, monitoring your social media spaces and taking clients on tour are the face of your company to the average customer. Remember your first day? My very first property was an ultra-luxury community in Newport Beach, California. Rents for a one-bedroom home started at $1,860 and went all the way up to over $4,000 per month. Now how much time and effort do ......
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