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Is Responding to Your Co-Worker’s Email Really Urgent? Here’s the Tea

------ We’ve all been there: a resident or client has a time-sensitive or decision-influencing question, and we realize a co-worker or different department holds the answer. We send an email requesting the information, and then… we wait. If we’re lucky, the response comes right away, but many times it can be hours, days, even a week or more before getting the answer we need. And until that response comes in, our work idles, our resident or client goes unsatisfied, and we may become increasingly anxious or frustrated by the delay. Is it unreasonable to expect a prompt reply to an email? Let’s explore. Our employee engagement surveys ask employees to what extent they agree with this statement: "Issues I raise are responded to within 24 hours by my supervisor, peers, or other departments." Depending on your role within a property management company, the experience can be quite different. According to the 2020 Swift Bunny Index: 83% of Corporate Operations employees (executives, director-level, department heads) agreed that they receive responses within 24 hours. However, the rest of the organization has a very different experience. Here’s the breakdown for everyone else: Only 59% of On-Site Team Members (Management, Leasing, Maintenance) and 57% of Corporate Support Services (Accounting, Marketing, Human Resources, IT, Administrative staff) agree that they receive a response within 24 hours. But this begs the question, is 24 hours a reasonable time frame to expect a response from a co-worker? For this, I posed that very question in Multifamily ShareSpace on Facebook t......
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The Three Things that Can Hamper Multifamily Innovation

The apartment industry has long been painted as one that’s afraid of change and reluctant to embrace new ways of doing things. That may have been true in the past, but when I look at multifamily today and the MICA session lineup, I see an industry brimming with ingenuity and an entrepreneurial spirit. Across the country, investors, operators and supplier partners are exploring a wide array of innovations to improve the resident experience and increase revenue. They’re implementing smart-home solutions, short-term rentals, self-guided tours, hotel-like resident services and increasingly sophisticated fitness amenities, to name just a few examples. But in looking at the industry, I do see three factors in play that often inhibit multifamily innovation and growth. Those factors are: 1) Government policy. I’m not here to make grand pronouncements about government being anti-business. However, from time to time, local, state and federal laws can – albeit unintentionally – stifle innovation. Take the growing number of rent-control laws, for example. When jurisdictions put a cap on rent, that limits the financial incentive to reinvest in and modernize portfolios. Similarly, some apartment communities may be reluctant to incorporate short-term rentals because the laws in their area may subject them to expensive hospitality taxes. It’s important for multifamily owners and operators, whether on their own or through an association, to speak up when laws and policies work against their interests and hamper their ability to innovate at their properties.  2) The lack of integration among technological solutions. It has to be easier to integrate individual multifamily technologies into any other technology ......
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Communicating Guidelines to New Tenants

Communicating Guidelines to New Tenants

 

Pilera RulesSummer is nearly upon us, and many property managers experience a tenant turn-over in the summer related to college schedules. Some of the people moving in might even be renting an apartment for the first time. To ensure a good relationship with your new tenants, it’s a good idea to set expectations right away.

When your tenant moves in or signs the lease, let them know what types of repairs they’re responsible for and what type of repairs you want to fix. For example, you might be fine with your tenant changing a lightbulb, but would prefer they don’t fix a clogged sink. You should also walk through the apartment with them and make sure they know how everything in the apartment works. Show them the stove, microwave, dishwasher, and thermostat.

When it comes to rent policy, be clear from day one. Let them know when rent is due, when you consider it late, and when you take action as a result of non-payment. This will help you avoid confusion later.

Although personal relationships and conversations about these things are important, some property managers find it helpful to print out a new tenant handbook. This handy manual will tell renters what to do if their sink is backing up in the middle of the night.

Having clear policies that are clearly communicated is the key to good relationships with your tenants.

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