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Is That the Pilot?? Creating a Culture of Success Part Three

Is That the Pilot?? Creating a Culture of Success Part Three
Remember the video of an airline forcibly removing a passenger from a flight that had been overbooked? In the aftermath of that public relations debacle many passengers who fly that airline (like me) were left wondering, "Hmmm....could that happen to me??" In other words, am I safe with this airline? Can I trust that they will honor the ticket I've purchased from them? Then, there was another situation that occurred when a pilot from this airline showed up to her flight dressed in civilian clothing and not in her pilot uniform. I can imagine the thoughts in the mind of the passengers and crew as they saw someone who looked like a passenger enter the cockpit. I know what my thoughts would be! BUT, IT GETS BETTER! This pilot then started what was described as a "long, bizarre speech" on the aircraft's PA system that referenced Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton and a comment directed towards an interracial couple seated near her. Here is what one passenger Tweeted while this was happening... Randy Reiss @undeadsinatra So, y'all. I'm shaking right now. I just left my ----- flight 455 'cos the captain demonstrated that she was not mentally in a safe space. The passengers on that flight did not feel safe with her being the pilot because they did not trust her ability to fly the plane. The foundation of a high-performance team, your department, your community, your region, your portfolio, your company are based on the same things that made passengers want to get off that flight; the......
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How to Deal with Associates Whose Performance Is Not Cutting It

The multifamily industry is a complex and demanding business. Companies need high-functioning associates to keep their communities running smoothly and to deliver satisfactory returns to investors. When even one team member's work is not meeting expectations, it can significantly hamper a multifamily company's operations. Therefore, underperforming associates must be addressed promptly and effectively.  Below are some tips for handling an employee whose work is not up to par: Avoid avoidanceLet's face it: confronting someone about his or her poor job performance can be an uncomfortable task. And it's easy to put off uncomfortable tasks. But a company is doing no one any favors when it delays having these tough conversations. So don't wait – address problems as quickly as possible. Be direct and be specificWhen discussing performance problems with an employee, you don't have to be unpleasant, but you should get straight to the point. Clearly state what the issues are and cite specific examples. Have a real conversationDon't let a meeting with a struggling associate become a monologue by HR. Give the employee a real chance to explain his or her performance and really listen to their feedback. Perhaps they are struggling with stress-management or other personal problems. Maybe they feel like they need more training in a certain area, or perhaps there are issues with fellow co-workers or supervisors that need to be examined. If any of these problems or similar ones are plaguing the employee, consider the ways your company can help. Give them a mentorProviding a struggling e......
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Giving Better Performance Reviews

Giving Better Performance Reviews
Let's face it: virtually nobody likes employee performance reviews. For community managers, performance reviews are one more thing to cram into an already hectic schedule, and they often mean confronting team members about performance issues.  For those being reviewed, the anxiety provoked by sitting down with their boss and going over their work with a fine-tooth comb can be profound. But it doesn't have to be that way. In fact, performance reviews can and should take place in a relaxed setting where boss and employee can frankly discuss performance and set clear goals for growth.  Below are some tips on how community managers can make performance reviews a more comfortable and productive process: Constantly Provide Feedback A performance review should never be the first time a team member hears about negative or even positive aspects of their performance. Effective community managers are always providing feedback to their employees.  When team members receive regular input from their managers, they will have a firm understanding of where they stand going into the review process. This understanding will in turn decrease their stress levels and set the stage for a more relaxed, productive conversation about their future. Be OrganizedFor those conducting the reviews, preparation can be easy to put off until the last minute. But it's important to resist this powerful temptation, or the actual meeting can become a rambling mess. Decide in advance the overarching purpose of the meeting. In other words, what do you want the main takeaway for the employee to be?......
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Who Do You Fire First?

b2ap3_thumbnail_who-do-you-fire---buy-in-versus-performance.pngThis blog was originally published by Forbes, whom we received permission from to republish. By Ty Kiisel It’s definitely counter-intuitive, but it could be one of your top performers. I was introduced to this idea by Patrick Morin, a brilliant sales executive and two-time turnaround CEO. Although the context of our discussions have been primarily regarding building, motivating, and keeping the best sales professionals, I’m convinced the same concepts apply to every role within a company—small or large. Although it’s sometimes the top performers that should find their necks on the chopping block first, it’s not their performance that puts them there. Most people want to contribute to something meaningful, something that will outlast their particular contribution. Our job as leaders is to inspire our employees with that vision—something that has them excited to start the workday every day. Unfortunately, not all of our employees buy-in to that vision. Some are even detractors. Morin looks at his employees on a four-grid scale with “Buy-In” on the vertical axis and “Performance” on the horizontal. When evaluating employees and potential employees he puts them into one of four categories: High Buy-In/ Low Performance Low Buy-In/Low Performance High Buy-In/ High Performance Low Buy-In/ High Performance Over the years I’ve been compelled to work with high-performing colleagues who didn’t like the company, had no respect for our customers, disliked their colleagues, and continuously shared their discontent with anyone who would listen. Like a cancer, their bad attitude spread throughout the organization—while they were otherwise regularly recognized for high performance. Morin suggested, “That would be......
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