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Copper Corrosion…It’s The Pits.

Copper Corrosion…It’s The Pits.
Copper Corrosion…It’s The Pits. Copper piping has been used in domestic water supply systems for nearly 100 years.  Originally, copper piping was projected to last 20-25 years, but with changes in water chemistry and other environmental factors, the rate of corrosion has accelerated, and the longevity of copper pipes has become a valid concern.   The Causes Many theories and a lot of research exist regarding the primary cause of copper pipe corrosion and it can be difficult to identify one single cause.   Once you navigate through the media noise and scientific engineering jargon, it’s clear that copper pitting corrosion is caused by a combination of factors–including improper pipe installation, bacteria, electrical grounding, soil acidity, pipe manufacture quality, water chemistry, the environment and more. In hotbed areas like Florida, Texas and California (where one could argue copper corrosion is an epidemic), there are increasing reports of premature copper corrosion and leaking pipes, often in buildings that are just a few years old.  But, it’s not limited to just those three states.  Trends show that states with higher amounts of chloramines and sulfites have copper pitting problems, ultimately resulting in the ubiquitous “pinhole leak” phenomenon.   But Why The Sudden Increase In Copper Corrosion?  Ironically, it’s the result of an increased public health effort to keep people safe.  Municipalities, following state and federal standards for safe drinking water, add chloramines and sulfites to treat the local water and keep the drinking water free of bacteria (and safer to drink).  Chloramines are chemical compou......
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When Good Pipes Go Bad

When Good Pipes Go Bad
A neglected plumbing system is a ticking time bomb As buildings age, building components need to be replaced—some more regularly than others. The best property managers know what these components are, and they plan for (and, more importantly, communicate regarding) their replacement well in advance so building owners can budget and be prepared. Unfortunately, many building components are hidden and therefore easily overlooked. To make matters worse, some managers and owners operate under the false assumption that certain parts of a building are meant to last the lifetime of the building. This is simply not the case, especially with plumbing. Whether defective or age-related, plumbing issues can be some of the worst a property can experience, given the nature of flooding leaks and their total potential damage to a building's structure and the property of residents. Other interior wall systems (i.e., electrical wiring or HVAC ducts) tend to have longer lifespans than plumbing, and they fail less often and less spectacularly. It's one thing to have your lights not turn on when you flick the switch— but having water flowing all over your furniture represents a totally different level of urgency and crisis. As such, it's critical that building owners and property managers inspect their pipes regularly. Obviously a small leak or drain stoppage is the first warning sign, but as leaks or stoppages begin to occur regularly, it's a good indication that there is a more systemic problem. While repiping a building is not inexpensive, it can be far less cos......
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